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You that, our patrons were pledged, should never adorn a slave! Drop into dust and die—the flower of Hellas utterly die, I too have a guerdon rare! The European Heart Journal is a success story: what started as the Cinderella of Cardiology 31 years ago 1 has—against the odds—become a major voice in clinical and basic research of cardiovascular medicine. —Ay, with Zeus the Defender, with Her of the ægis and spear! Eur Heart J 2008;29:1903-10. Fresh and fit your message to bear, once lips give it birth!" What matter if slackedMy speed may hardly be, for homage to crag and to caveNo deity deigns to drape with verdure?—at least I can breathe,Fear in thee no fraud from the blind, no lie from the mute!' Present to help, potent to save, Pan—patron I call! Already she rounds to it fast: It is inherently improbable, since if the Athenians wanted to send an urgent message to Athens there was no reason why they could not have sent a messenger on horseback. As, under the human trunk, the goat-thighs grand I saw. Your command I obeyed, In any case, no such story appears in Herodotus. https://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?title=Pheidippides&oldid=4386746, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. © Poems are the property of their respective owners. Pound—Pan helping us—Persia to dust, and, under the deep, From the racer's toil, no vulgar reward in praise or in pelf!' Ivy drooped wanton, kissed his head, moss cushioned his hoof: Who could race like a God, bear the face of a God, whom a God loved so well; Run, Pheidippides, one race more! Ponder that precept of old, 'No warfare, whatever the odds "Halt, Pheidippides! So, to this day, when friend meets friend, the word of salute. Hand and heart and voice! "While, as for thee..." But enough! Though the story is almost certainly a myth, it is based on an even more impressive feat of endurance by Pheidippides. First I salute this soil of the blessed, river and rock!Gods of my birthplace, dæmons and heroes, honour to all!Then I name thee, claim thee for our patron, co-equal in praiseAy, with Zeus the Defender, with Her of the ægis and spear!Also, ye of the bow and the buskin, praised be your peer,Now, henceforth, and forever,—O latest to whom I upraiseHand and heart and voice! Hie to my bouse and home: and, when my children shall creep For Athens, leave pasture and flock!Present to help, potent to save, Pan—patron I call! As many as 25,000 people will run 26.2 miles today in the Boston Marathon, first run in 1897, a year after the marathon race was created to honor the legendary run of Greek messenger Pheidippides from Marathon to Athens. Persia has come, we are here, where is She?" the meed is thy due! So is Pheidippides happy forever,--the noble strong man. Vain was the filleted victim, the fulsome libation! Night in the fosse?Athens to aid? Answer me quick, what help, what hand do you stretch o'er destruction's brink? The traditional story relates that Pheidippides(530bc-490bc), an Athenian herald, was sent to Sparta to request help when the Persians landed at Marathon, Greece. Here am I back. Athens,—except for that sparkle,—thy name, I had mouldered to ash!That sent a blaze thro' my blood; off, off and away was I back,—Not one word to waste, one look to lose on the false and the vile!Yet 'O Gods of my land!' Henceforth be allowed thee releaseFrom the racer's toil, no vulgar reward in praise or in pelf!' Pheidippides (Greek: Φειδιππίδης, sometimes given as Phidippides, by Herodotus and Plutarch, or as Philippides), hero of Ancient Greece, is the central figure in a story that was the inspiration for a modern sporting event, the marathon. Such my cry as, rapid, I ran over Parnes' ridge; So, to this day, when friend meets friend, the word of salute Is still 'Rejoice! This reference article is mainly selected from the English Wikipedia with only minor checks and changes (see www.wikipedia.org for details of authors and sources) and is available under the, Ancient History, Classical History and Mythology. For Athens, leave pasture and flock! All the great God was good in the eyes grave-kindly—the curl He flung down his shield In your favour, so long as the moon, half-orbed, is unable to take Out of the day dive, into the day as bravely arise! Pheidippides Poem by Robert Browning - Poem Hunter, Poem Submitted: Thursday, December 10, 2015. I too have a guerdon rare! Gravely they turned to take counsel, to cast for excuses. "Athens is saved! Ran like fire once more: and the space 'twixt the Fennel-field Herodotus was writing about 50 years after the events he describes, so it is reasonably likely that Pheidippides is a historical figure. He flung down his shield,Ran like fire once more: and the space 'twixt the Fennel-fieldAnd Athens was stubble again, a field which a fire runs through,Till in he broke: 'Rejoice, we conquer!' Athens,—except for that sparkle,—thy name, I had mouldered to ash! Phoibos and Artemis, clang them 'Ye must'!' No care for my limbs!—there's lightning in all and some— Archons of Athens, topped by the tettix, see, I return!See, 'tis myself here standing alive, no spectre that speaks!Crowned with the myrtle, did you command me, Athens and you,'Run, Pheidippides, run and race, reach Sparta for aid!Persia has come, we are here, where is She?' --his word which brought rejoicing indeed. Like wine thro' clay,Joy in his blood bursting his heart, he died—the bliss! No deity deigns to drape with verdure?—at least I can breathe, So, when Persia was dust, all cried "To Akropolis! he gracious began: For Athens, leave pasture and flock! Gully and gap, I clambered and cleared till, sudden, a bar Fight I shall, with our foremost, wherever this fennel may grow,— Brows made bold by your leaf! Like wine through clay, ''(Gay, the liberal hand held out this herbage I bear—Fennel,—I grasped it a-tremble with dew—whatever it bode),'While, as for thee...' But enough! 'Rosily blushed the youth: he paused: but, lifting at lengthHis eyes from the ground, it seemed as he gathered the rest of his strengthInto the utterance—'Pan spoke thus: 'For what thou hast doneCount on a worthy reward! Pheidippides ( Greek: Φειδιππιδης, sometimes given as Phidippides or Philippides), hero of Ancient Greece, is the central figure in a story which was the inspiration for the modern sporting event, the marathon. Love in its choice, paid you so largely service so slack! Though the dive were through Erebos, thus I obey— Archons of Athens, topped by the tettix, see, I return! Swing of thy spear? And Athens was stubble again, a field which a fire runs through, Persia bids Athens proffer slaves'-tribute, water and earth;Razed to the ground is Eretria.—but Athens? I stood Pan, he said, called him by name and told him to ask the Athenians why they paid him no attention, in spite of his friendliness towards them and the fact that he had often been useful to them in the past, and would be so again in the future. Parnes to Athens—earth no more, the air was my road: Into the utterance—"Pan spoke thus: 'For what thou hast done He was gone. Athens to aid? Is still "Rejoice! "Hither to me! Than I what godship to Athens more helpful of old?Ay, and still, and forever her friend! Die, with the wide world spitting at Sparta, the stupid, the stander-by? shall Athens, sink,Drop into dust and die—the flower of Hellas utterly die,Die with the wide world spitting at Sparta, the stupid, the stander-by?Answer me quick,—what help, what hand do you stretch o'er destruction's brink?How,—when? Yes, he fought on the Marathon day:So, when Persia was dust, all cried 'To Akropolis!Run, Pheidippides, one race more! He then ran the 42 km (26.2 miles) from the battlefield by the town of Marathon to Athens to announce the Greek victory over Persia in the Battle of Marathon ( 490 BC) with the word "Νενικήκαμεν!" "—halt I did, my brain of a whirl: and died on the spot. Joy in his blood bursting his heart, he died--the bliss! In the temples and tombs! See, 'tis myself here standing alive, no spectre that speaks! for I minded the hollow to traverse, the fissure across: Count we no time lost time which lags through respect to the Gods! Hand and heart and voice! Till in he broke: "Rejoice, we conquer!" Than I what godship to Athens more helpful of old? 'Halt, Pheidippides! If I ran hitherto— Night in the fosse? Lo, their answer at last! Jutted, a stoppage of stone against me, blocking the way. the meed is thy due! Run, Pheidippides, one race more! Persia bids Athens proffer slaves'-tribute, water and earth; Wherefore? " Already she rounds to it fast:Athens must wait, patient as we—who judgment suspend.' Like wine through clay, what was it I came on, of wonders that are? Into their midst I broke: breath served but for 'Persia has come! I cried, as each hillock and plain,Wood and stream, I knew, I named, rushing past them again,'Have ye kept faith, proved mindful of honours we paid you erewhile?Vain was the filleted victim, the fulsome libation! Is still "Rejoice!" Was the space between city and city: two days, two nights did I burn Present to help, potent to save, Pan—patron I call! —Fennel—I grasped it a-tremble with dew—whatever it bode) "Have ye kept faith, proved mindful of honours we paid you erewhile? Ay, and still, and forever her friend! Möhlenkamp S, Lehmann N, Breuckmann F, et al. So they waited for the full moon, and meanwhile Hippias, the son of Pisistratus, guided the Persians to Marathon. Fade at the Persian's foot, You that, our patrons were pledged, should never adorn a slave!Rather I hail thee, Parnes,—trust to thy wild waste tract! Pheidippides redux: reducing risk for acute cardiac events during marathon running. Then I name thee, claim thee for our patron, co-equal in praise It seems likely that in the 500 years between Herodotus's time and Plutarch's, the story of Pheidippides had become muddled with that of the Battle of Marathon, and some fanciful writer had invented the story of the run from Marathon to Athens. And Athens was stubble again, a field which a fire runs through, Gods of my birthplace, dæmons and heroes, honour to all! ——— Count on a worthy reward! Together we made it! Χαίρετε, νικῶμεν. Malice,—each eye of her gave me its glitter of gratified hate! "—Pheidippides dies in the shout for his meed. The relevant passage of Herodotus (Histories, 105...106 [ 1 ])(The mountains in this area are too steep for horses to move with speed) is: Before they left the city, the Athenian generals sent off a message to Sparta. ("Fennel-field" is a reference to the Greek word for fennel, marathon, the origin of the name of the battlefield.)

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